Comments

CMBA Blogathon: Come Next Spring (1956) — 17 Comments

  1. CW: I sympathize about your VHS bootleg. Video-wise I'm in much the same fix — a bootleg DVD that is merely watchable and barely adequate for pulling the frame-caps I used in this post (the disc kept freezing up the player on my computer). I've had better luck on 16mm. First was a print from eBay where the seller described the color as "good". He was a liar; the print was lemonade-pink, about one year from fading away completely. I screened it once (hadn't seen the movie in 30 years) and junked it. But I hit the jackpot with my second print (from a far more reputable seller): First seven minutes are Kodak SP with warm color; thereafter, beautiful Eastman LPP.

  2. A beautifully written post, Jim. I hope to enjoy discovering this movie myself very soon, as I've heard great things about it, but nothing so detailed and informative, and charming, as your post. Thanks.

  3. I loved that you included photos of the town where it was filmed! I think the local tourism board should pay you a commission.

    I was not at all familiar with Pittman before reading your excellent post. It is sad, indeed, to think what he might have done if he lived longer.

    Agreed re: Ann Sheridan. She really was underrated, and I'm keen to see her as an "older" actress in this film.

    Thanks for recommending this (new to me) film!

  4. I haven't seen Come Next Spring, but you written such a fascinating and informative post on it (and interesting about the Twilight Zone-Pittman connection; I think "The Grave" is one of the series' best episodes). And I just love Steve Cochran, and would love to see this film just for him.

  5. This film sounds fabulous! The title is only slightly familiar but with such a cast I'm wondering why I never bothered hunting it down earlier. Thanks for all the great trivia behind its making. As an added bonus : Richard Eyer appeared as the genie in that other fabulous film of the 1950s – The 7th Voyage of Sinbad.

  6. Welcome, Sisters, and thanks for the kind words! You're right, Richard Eyer was Barani the Genie in The 7th Voyage of Sinbad. You might want to check out what I said about him when I posted on Sinbad here.

    Thanks for stopping by; please return often!