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Ups and Downs of the Rollercoaster, Part 6 — 6 Comments

  1. You must be doing this to eventually write a book if not then you should and I now want a thank you credit when the book does come out.

  2. Can' t wait for the festival to start! During HTWWW, I'm going to watch carefully to see I can tell the different camera shots; thanks for pointing this out.

  3. Hi Jim!
    Thanks again for another wonderful series. One advantage of your site is that you can tell a compelling story over many chapters. Unlike a magazine article, which has to condense all the highlights into one entry. Fans like me, who missed out on all these facets of the movies when they first happened, owe you a great debt. I can't wait to see what's next!

  4. HI – I am researching the work of a British architect called Cedric Price (1934-2003). He lists amongst his projects a design for a tent for a client in Holland (1963-71), and the photos in his archive show the more robust version of the tent with tilted roof. The textual records of the project are thin and inconclusive. Do you know who designed that tent? I wonder if Cedric got his hands on a decomissioned one and reused it for his own client's purposes? Any clues would be greatly appreciated!
    Samantha Hardingham, London

  5. Welcome,Samantha! And please forgive the delay in responding to your request. I'm afraid I can't tell you much more about the traveling Cinerama tent than is already in my post. Most of my info came from David Strohmaier's excellent documentary Cinerama Adventure; you can learn more about the documentary at the link. Also, there's a "Contact Us" page where you can get in touch with Mr. Strohmaier directly for further information; I've always found him very prompt and helpful.

    There's also more about Cinerama's history at the In70mm Web site; a little sloshing around may lead you to more details about that tent.

    If Cedric Price's tent project for his Dutch client started in 1963, seems to me it could well have involved a decomissioned "Itinerama" tent. That was around the time Nicolas Reisini was trying to regroup and shore up Cinerama's finances (eventually getting nosed out by William Forman and Pacific Theatres), and he might easily have been happy to unload the tent on a respected architect who had a use for it. This, however, is purely speculation on my part; David Strohmaier or somebody at Pacific Theatres might perhaps shed some light on the question.

    Good luck and good hunting, and thanks for stopping by!